Speaker Series 2020

by Grant Elliott
The 2020 Speakers Series, a joint collaboration between Lone Pine Land Trust and Northumberland Land Trust, was held at Venture 13 in Cobourg with three speakers lined up for January, February and March.
Our January speaker was Gary Pritchard, Manager of Environment and Consultations at Cambium Indigenous Professional Services, who launched a successful start to our series. Gary focused on Aboriginal perspectives relating to conservation practices and reliance on the land and provided an excellent history of land claims within Ontario. He engaged the audience by highlighting current conservation management practices – there were so many questions we could have continued long into the evening. The event ended with Gary hosting a smudging ceremony for all who wished to participate.
Our February speaker was Verena Sesin, a PhD candidate from Trent University. Verena based her presentation on her work related to her PhD thesis, “A Balanced Approach to Chemical Control of Invasive Plants”. Verena spoke of the importance of this topic and its relevance to controlling invasive species while trying to protect native species. She outlined the balance that must exist when chemicals are used and explained that the concentration should not harm surrounding native species. Verena’s presentation was well received and prompted many questions from our audience related to protecting native and at-risk wetland plants.
Unfortunately, our March speaker event was cancelled due to Covid-19. This was to be a presentation from Tamara Segal of Hawthorn Herbals of Picton. She has agreed to be one of our speakers for 2021 and we look forward to hearing about the work that she does with plant medicine.
We look forward to our continuing joint initiative with the Northumberland Land Trust next year.

Speaker Series 2019

See Update below!
The Lone Pine Land Trust is continuing its partnership with the Northumberland Land Trust in sponsoring an annual Speakers Series. This year the Speakers Series will be held at Venture 13 at 739 D’Arcy Street Cobourg, ON. The speaker events will take place on the third Thursday of January, February, and March at 7pm.
We have a very exciting line-up of speakers.

Allie Anderson • January 17

Allie is a PhD candidate from Trent University who has been working on the James Bay Shorebird Project. Her PhD research examines flexibility in shorebird migratory strategies related to stopover diet, habitat use, departure flights, and migration.

Dianne Saxe, the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario • February 21

Prior to her appointment, Dianne was one of Canada’s most respected environmental lawyers. She has 40 years of unparalleled experience writing, interpreting, and litigating Ontario’s energy and environmental laws. Dianne was appointed ECO in 2015. In 2018, the government cancelled her position. Visit http://eco.on.ca for information on the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario.

Monique Aarts and John Urquhart, Blazing Star Environmental • March 21

Blazing Star Environmental has been working locally over the past year looking at natural habitats for specific species, particularly reptiles and amphibians. The focus for their project has been Durham Region and Northumberland County due to the rapid pace of growth in the area. Fortunately, a considerable amount of connected natural habitat exists in the area. This same area is an obvious data gap for reptile and amphibian species at risk (SAR). Blazing Star Environmental has teamed up with local conservation groups to find and protect any undiscovered populations of reptiles and amphibians before it is too late. They will present their findings from the past year of study in the 2 regions.

Update: A summary of this year’s speaker series

The Lone Pine Marsh Land Trust once again partnered with the Northumberland Land Trust to offer an inspiring speakers’ series in January, February and March. In order to accomodate a growing number of attendees, the talks were held at Venture 13 on Darcy St. in Cobourg.
The 2019 series was a great success. In January, Alexandra Anderson from Trent University presented her research on migration strategies of shorebirds using James Bay shoreline as a stopover site. In February, Dianne Saxe,
the former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, presented on the state of the Environment in Ontario and shared ideas on how citizens could become more engaged to make a difference environmentally. Finally in March, Blazing Star Environmental presented their findings on populations of amphibian and reptile species at risk in Northumberland County.
All speakers keenly shared ideas on how we could improve the environment and/or contribute to conservation within Northumberland County and Canada. They inspired us and also challenged us to do more!
We value the partnership with the Northumberland Land Trust and look forward to the continued success of our speakers’ series which will launch again in January of 2020. Stay tuned through the web site and future newsletters for the speakers’ series program for next year.

Jeff Bowman, Flying Squirrels – Feb 15, 2018

On February 15, Jeff Bowman, professor at Trent University and scientist at the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, presented to a packed house (72 people) at the Cobourg Public Library (Northumberland Land Trust and Lone Pine Land Trust organized this event).

Dr. Bowman began his talk by showing the relationship of flying squirrels to squirrels common in North America – they are closely related. Two species of flying squirrels are found in North America, the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) and the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). Both of the species are found in Ontario, though the southern flying squirrel is limited by cold temperatures in the middle of winter. The northern flying squirrel is found in coniferous forests, while the southern flying squirrel prefers deciduous forests. Where populations overlap, Dr. Bowman’s research group has found that the two species can hybridize. This may be due to the southern flying squirrel’s winter nesting behaviour, as they prefer to nest with other individuals (presumably to keep warmer).
Dr. Bowman showed how the research team monitors a population of flying squirrels at the James McLean Oliver Ecological Centre research station (using PIT tags and small radio collars). These techniques have allowed the group to examine nesting and caching behaviours of the squirrels. He also touched on other interesting aspects of flying squirrels, such as their ultrasonic vocalizations.
Dr. Bowman answered the audience’s questions following the presentation. Comments by the audience were very positive and we all felt that we had learned a great deal about about these elusive creatures.
For more information, visit the Flying Squirrel Project.

Out and About at Prairie Day


written by Paulette Hebert
On September 9, Doug McRae and Paulette Hebert attended Prairie Day on behalf of the Lone Pine Land Trust. Prairie Day is an event hosted by the Alderville Black Oak Savanna and the Rice Lake Plains Joint Initiative to raise awareness and provide education to the public about prairie and savannah habitat that surrounds Rice Lake. Doug and Paulette greeted guests at the Lone Pine Land Trust information booth and provided information on the properties we protect, membership and opportunities to donate land or make financial contributions. The public was also encouraged to visit accessible Lone Pine properties such as the Braham Tract on Maple Grove Road. Other members of the Rice Lake Plains Joint Initiative were also on hand with information and freebies like books and stickers. It was a great opportunity to meet and network with like-minded organizations.
A host of fun and informative activities were also offered by the Alderville Black Oak Savannah and a number of other participants. There were guided tours of the Prairie, demonstrations about the cultivation and preparation of local wild rice and acorn flour, entertainment such as the Sugar Island Singers and a puppet show for the kids. There were also reptiles, bird banding, bees, plants and plenty of great food including scones, indigenous style.
What a perfect way to get your dose of nature! Many thanks to the Alderville Black Oak Savannah for all the work they put into Prairie Day, it was a great success.