Species of Concern – Nov 17, 2016

On November 17, Donald Sutherland spoke to members and friends of the Lone Pine and Northumberland Land Trusts about Species of Concern. Don Sutherland is a zoologist with the Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC).
The Natural Heritage Information Centre of Ontario is a member of NatureServe. NatureServe is a network of data centres in North and South America that maintain data on species’ abundances and distributions. A common methodology is used by all of the data centres and this makes the observations comparable across the full geographic area.
NatureServe’s most important definition is the element occurrence. NHIC defines an element occurrence as:

an area of land and/or water where a species or plant community is or was present. They represent areas important to the conservation of a species or plant community such as the courtship, nesting, rearing and feeding areas of a bird.

Element occurrences are used to produce species ranks that estimate the risk of extinction of a species (or subspecies). There are subnational ranks (defined in Ontario by NHIC), national ranks, and global ranks. Don Sutherland provided examples of species that meeting the five levels of subnational ranks in Ontario with photos and descriptions. The examples helped the audience understand the ranks and types of species that meet the criteria.
For more information on the Natural Heritage Information Centre or NatureServe, click the above links in the article.

Don Sutherland talks about Species of Concern, Nov 17, 2016. (credit: Dalila Seckar)

There are two more speakers in our winter speaker series partnership (with Northumberland Land Trust). Erica Nol will speak about songbirds on Feb 16 and James Conolly will talk about human settlement in Northumberland County. Both talks will take place at the Cobourg Library Rotary Room at 7pm.

Lone Pine Land Trust attends 2016 OLTA Conference

written by Dalila Seckar
On October 20 and 21, I attended the Ontario Land Trust Alliance conference at Geneva Park YMCA conference centre north of Orillia. Gary Bugg (also on the Board of Directors) and Sara Kelly (part-time coordinator) also attended part of the conference, with support from Ontario Trillium Foundation. Each day, there were several workshops with options to attend as well as plenary speakers. The workshops were primarily presented by employees or board members of land trusts and attendees shared valuable ideas. Below the photo of Geneva Park is a brief summary of the workshops and talks that I attended.

I learned about multivariate analysis that can be used to target land securement. With this technique, properties are evaluated based on criteria that includes considerations and risks. At another workshop, I learned about a natural heritage database (created for OLTA members) that can be used to store information on biota found in land trust properties.
I also attended workshops that focussed on member engagement and fundraising. Other land trusts gave examples of techniques they use to reach out and interact with property neighbours and members. Examples of campaigns and electronic news bulletin management systems were given. With respect to fundraising, presenters recommended creating stories that connect and resonate with donors.
The closing speaker was Dr. Diane Saxe, Ontario’s Environmental Commissioner. Reports on the government’s performance are available on the Environmental Commissioner website. Dr. Saxe recommended that all individuals make comments on proposals on Ontario’s Environmental Registry. Even if you do not have time to fully read the proposal and make an informed comment, letting the government know that you are concerned about the topic still has value. All provinces do not have the Environmental Registry or an Environmental Commissioner and Ontarians should make use of these tools.

Benefit Concert – Oct 1, 2016

written by Marg Fleming
The benefit concert held on the evening of October 1 for the newly designated Lone Pine Land Trust (LPLT) has been, to date, the event highlight this year. Local musical sensation The Fade Kings gave their talent and time back to the community by hosting an entertaining evening of music that spanned several generations. The evening was made special by The Old Church Theatre venue where comfortable casual seating and refreshments gave an ‘at home’ ambiance to the performance.
LPLT board member Doug McRae introduced The Fade Kings thanking them for their contribution to local habitat conservation, then turned the evening over to the band. More heads were bobbing than a peep convention on a Presqu’ile beach as the audience enjoyed old favourites with a new twist, sweetened by the fine acoustics of The Old Church Theatre. Regular Fade Kings David Impey (percussion), John de Vries (base), Leigh Moore (keyboard), and Eric Fry (lead guitar) were joined by guest artist Ian Kojima (saxophone) for the first 60-minute set. Ian is accomplished in his own right, having played with a palette of notable artists around the world including BB King, and toured for 15 years internationally with singer-songwriter instrumentalist Chris de Burgh. Ian added a unique dimension to the evening’s sound and soul. And just before intermission the audience was treated to a surprise performance by the legendary Ila Vann whose voice has joined those of iconic performers such as Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong. Ms. Vann was one of Ray Charles’ “Rayettes” and in the 1970s had a #1 hit in the UK, “Can’t Help Lovin’ That Man”.

Fade Kings at Old Church Theatre, Oct 1, 2016.

Sincere thanks go to The Fade Kings for donation of their time and talent in the interest of local conservation. The band’s proceeds were presented to LPLT for ongoing habitat preservation on its four constituent properties. You can follow The Fade Kings at www.fadekings.com to view their upcoming schedule and catch another one of their local performances. And a calendar of presentations at The Old Church Theatre, possibly the best kept secret in the area, can be found at www.oldchurchtheatre.ca.

Early Summer Walk at Braham Tract – Jun 11, 2016

On June 11, members joined the board of directors of Lone Pine Marsh Sanctuary for a walk at the Braham tract. Despite warnings for thunderstorms and showers, there was no precipitation and a heat wave set in. Thanks to George Wilkinson’s mowing efforts, members were able to traverse the northern meadow loops more easily. Bobolinks and meadowlarks were observed in these grassed areas.

Doug McRae tells members about bobolinks and meadowlarks during a guided walk (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Doug McRae tells members about bobolinks and meadowlarks during a guided walk (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)

At the beaver dam, dragonflies and arrowhead were observed.

Members observe dragonflies beside the creek and weir (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Members observe dragonflies beside the creek and weir (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)

Members then went south to the observation deck and followed the edge of the marsh south through the shrubs (which Doug McRae had recently pruned). Ferns (sensitive and cinnamon) were lush adjacent to the trails.

Ferns and cattails on the edge of the marsh (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Ferns and cattails on the edge of the marsh (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)

At the edge of the forest (where they were finally beset by mosquitoes) members stopped and Gary Bugg pointed out the new trail loop into the southern forest.

Gary Bugg points out the new trail loop into the southern woods (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Gary Bugg points out the new trail loop into the southern woods (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)

Members turned back before completing the loop south forest loop due to time constraints (and remaining poison ivy on the trail).

Members walk through grass between pines and the marsh (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Members walk through grass between pines and the marsh (Braham Tract, Jun 11, 2016). (credit: Dalila Seckar)

Following the walk, members had lunch and met to discuss special resolutions and hold the annual general meeting.

Introducing Lone Pine Land Trust

On June 11, the board of directors and members of Lone Pine Marsh Sanctuary met at the Braham tract for a walk of the property (and introduction to new trails) followed by lunch, a special meeting, and the annual general meeting.

Meetings under the shelter at the Braham tract with members. (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Meetings under the shelter at the Braham tract with members. (credit: Dalila Seckar)

At the Special Meeting, new by-laws were passed (with amendments) and the name was officially changed to Lone Pine Land Trust. Since the addition of the Wilkinson, Kennedy, and Munn tracts to the original marsh (Braham tract), our land ownership in the watershed of Cold and Marsh Creeks has increased to a total of 371 acres. The addition of “Land Trust” to our name immediately tells people what our organization is about. To simplify the name, we dropped “Marsh Sanctuary” from the title; we will continue to focus on acquiring wetlands and lands adjacent to the creeks and be a sanctuary to the indigenous organisms of the area.

Members observe the marsh (Braham tract) on Jun 11, 2016. (credit: Dalila Seckar)
Members observe the marsh (Braham tract) on Jun 11, 2016. (credit: Dalila Seckar)